Happy Women’s Day

Feminism isn’t a threat, it’s a need! Feminism doesn’t mean women being more equal, it means true equality! Because of many such powerful, thoughtful women, now women can vote, and are able to fight to prove their existence. Equality and respect is the agenda.


The concept of surname/last name suggests we all are part of patriarchal societies, and in certain cultures, it’s still a struggle for a girl child to enjoy life. And in certain others, it’s a struggle for a female foetus to push her way out of a mother’s womb. It’s also strange that as families many are supportive of female prosperity and empowerment, but not as societies! Me too is just another example of the same global scenario.


I should also remind fellow women to be bold and confident as they are! We don’t need plastic surgeries to be endowed or put makeup on to please others. Every human being looks beautiful with a smile on their face and empathy and love for others.


Anyway, I met a good friend after a gap. She looked brave and beautiful after a double mastectomy early Jan. Not sure why three out of five I meet in the US have had or been diagnosed with cancer. Thanks to the advanced Medical research and technology, lives are saved. Even prouder of the women who are part of not only science, technology, self defense, et al, but also role models of exemplary nurture building progressive societies. Such women who are strong are an inspiration. We want women to be bold mentally and strong physically. Happy women’s day!

#womenpower #womensday

Nature and Nurture


“I would have loved to join you all over this weekend, but I teach English to immigrants” – One of our ‘white’ friends in UK during my initial days there. Just getting into my sales sector and being a married, teetotaler, new to country employee, I found my husband Bala’s university colleagues more open to get into groups. They were diverse too. It included Brits, Jamaicans, an Arabic, an Indian, a German, and a Barbadian. Their discussions varied from accents to dialects to baking and cooking to cultures to racism. To me, who grew up with ‘Fair & Lovely’, a face cream to enhance fair skin by the Hindustan Unilever company, racism is totally an ambiguous concept. Racism to Indians is a concept we compromise and get used to on a daily basis. It could happen with in the families to inter-state. Many of us wake up to the word racism only when we step out of the country! To non-Indians, we are all brown skinned and this Indian concept of fairness doesn’t matter. So this Indian fairness, a myopic concept of what is fair on which the fairness and skin-bleaching industry is built, is a made to believe concept. This is both a nature and a nurture problem. But why?

Every country has its own internal differences and issues that are unavoidable or inevitable. India too has them. Wounded by innumerable invasions, cultural disparities, and religious persecutions India has been evolving every day for the past 3700 years. Now, the fight is between the powerful vs the normal citizens, and with politicians giving every struggle a political touch, it has become the responsibility of India’s mature citizens to truly demonstrate ‘unity in diversity’ with all these ongoing issues. There are about 50+public holidays in India and children have always been growing in a multi-cultural society for as long as any one can remember- the amalgamation of nature and nurture. But we still believe in white is good, black is bad; with an instilled Indian belief that southerners are dark /black in complexion, this is also a also a North vs South problem. Yet, applying those fairness creams, we join the BLM (Black lives matter) movements that happen abroad. Rather ironically, the same film stars who are brand ambassadors of these creams are the first to tweet support for BLM.

It has always been the case of the stronger oppressing the weaker, be it under the pretense of colonialism, nepotism, capitalism, or racism; across the countries, across the cultures! So, is this a nature vs nurture problem or a question of mind over matter? May be both, or to put in simpler words, it’s the mindset. But with societies evolving, can we generalise opinions and facts? The answer is “NO”!
Unquestionably black lives matter; human lives matter; women matter; lives matter. We are all one human race. Who are we to decide if one race is more equal or less? And why do we even have to fight for what is ours? Even after decades of abolishing slavery and untouchability, after the win in the women’s suffrage movements why are we on streets fighting for equality? What can we do to be the change? Definitely not by sharing what’s already been published in the news papers; not by taking political sides to stay disguised and play the game of equality. As literate souls, we need to look inwards and educate ourselves and the ones dependent on us for their formation.

I have observed that not all families or parents discuss these issues with children and these future citizens are raised being totally blinded to the efforts put in by some reformists and achievements that happen slowly but steadily. Until children reach to their individuation process, their thoughts and deeds are either taught and practised at home, or hereditary.

“Can you decline a service offered by a doctor that doesn’t belong to your caste/religion/faith? If the head of the district/state/country who hails from another faith invites you to dinner, would you reject it? In the casteist society, some were treated inhumanly by others, and our forefathers might have done it too. Would you be okay if your own friend harbours such an opinion against you and humiliates you? It’s time we bear the brunt to bring in the desired change. One cannot be prejudiced, judged, discriminated or hated based on the physical appearances or the nature of the birth.” This was my dad’s response to my sister’s query about casteism in India.
With head held high and hand on my heart, I can proudly say, he showed us the path of humanity and led us the right way. In this whole process of uplifting the down trodden masses, my dad was a victim too. He was denied prestigious professor posts in reputed universities twice -once by a powerful sect and another time because of ‘generalised’ view by the decision maker, whose forefathers might have been oppressed on the name of casteism. He never complained about those nor developed hatred against any one particular community. All he did and does is to encourage any one interested in pursuing education and support them how ever he could including feeding those aspirants at home- irrespective of what caste or religion they belong to. These life lessons have been helping me navigate professionally and personally, and not be judgemental based on people’s appearances and origin. Be it my dad in his own country or my kids else where or me or you -everyone of us is always generalised and judged. Yet, the beauty of this journey is meeting similar people with same values; majority of them don’t share my nationality, skin colour or faith. People aren’t all good or bad based on their physical appearances.

Next time, before any of us try to generalise, remember, that’s not fair!

Yes, people are being oppressed and movements must be justified. I exercised my first right to vote at the age of 18 with pride without totally appreciating the women’s suffrage movements that went behind. I also enjoyed living in the West without being humiliated everyday because of my skin colour. There were lots of sacrifices made by our pioneers and the BLMs help us survive too. I would also appreciate white people who fought for our human rights then and participating now in the BLM movements just like many of the social reformers from the Hindu upper castes that fought against untouchability, and men who fought against sati (cruel system to kill wives whose lost their husbands). I believe that to bring in the equality, we don’t have to pull others down. Equality cannot be a wheel in which some one has to be oppressed all the times. We need a change in the mind set. One cannot bring in their preexisting opinions while dealing with people of any colour or country. Yes, we do carry a herd mentality that represents us and separates one sect of people to the other. But every interaction must be started afresh. It has to be beyond the method in madness. All we need is to remind ourselves that we are humans first.

In innumerable counts, I have seen people vehemently spreading hatred and I wonder what they teach their children? The golden rule for parenting is to not say ‘don’t‘ to a child; instead its advised we offer them a safer alternative and encourage they try that. So, that principle doesn’t apply to these adults? Judging everyone based on their appearances, culture, and likes/dislikes is utter nonsense. Instead, to express what one prefers and why is much more a better approach than announcing what one hates! This latter approach doesn’t serve any purpose.

Be the change doesn’t mean preach hatred. Be the change is to do something valuable that really could help those who need it. Be the change includes educating our own children about how they deal with others including being empathetic towards everyone’s needs, being socially responsible, being part of community events- not just our dedicated group that only caters to our individual needs; using our language/professional skills not to just support our children get those ‘voluntary hours’ but truly dedicate time and efforts to those communities that are in desperate need for them just like our English friend I mentioned in the beginning.

Any movement aimed at bringing in equality or treating every one and thing with respect should be an ongoing process, not triggered by one event that creates the troughs and crests momentarily. “Go with an open mind when you meet any one. Let not their colour, creed, faith provoke you into assumptions. Have an open dialogue, offer a true hand of friendship. Not everyone can be friends, but that shouldn’t be b(i)ased on physical appearances. Everyone is equally equal”- is what I teach my kids. What do you teach them?